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Viewers have been complaining about it for years. 

Now film technicians say inaudible dialogue on TV shows is a deliberate choice by directors who take the idea from cinema for a more ‘realistic’ performance.

The BBC has fallen victim to using mumbling actors, or ‘mumbledom’. 

Now film technicians say inaudible dialogue on TV shows is a deliberate choice by directors who take the idea from cinema for a more ‘realistic’ performance. Pictured: Catherine in Happy Valley

Now film technicians say inaudible dialogue on TV shows is a deliberate choice by directors who take the idea from cinema for a more ‘realistic’ performance. Pictured: Catherine in Happy Valley

Now film technicians say inaudible dialogue on TV shows is a deliberate choice by directors who take the idea from cinema for a more ‘realistic’ performance. Pictured: Catherine in Happy Valley

Pictured: Happy Valley star Charlie Murphy. Happy Valley is one such programme accused of having mumbling actors

Pictured: Happy Valley star Charlie Murphy. Happy Valley is one such programme accused of having mumbling actors

Pictured: Happy Valley star Charlie Murphy. Happy Valley is one such programme accused of having mumbling actors

Malcolm Johnson, of the Institute of Professional Sound, told The Daily Telegraph: ‘Directors are persuading actors to downplay their delivery, and almost throw their lines away, thinking that it is more realistic'. Pictured: Peaky Blinders

Malcolm Johnson, of the Institute of Professional Sound, told The Daily Telegraph: ‘Directors are persuading actors to downplay their delivery, and almost throw their lines away, thinking that it is more realistic'. Pictured: Peaky Blinders

Malcolm Johnson, of the Institute of Professional Sound, told The Daily Telegraph: ‘Directors are persuading actors to downplay their delivery, and almost throw their lines away, thinking that it is more realistic’. Pictured: Peaky Blinders

It has promised – and failed – to overcome sound issues after complaints about series such as crime drama Happy Valley.

Viewers have been forced to resort to using subtitles.

Malcolm Johnson, of the Institute of Professional Sound, told The Daily Telegraph: ‘Directors are persuading actors to downplay their delivery, and almost throw their lines away, thinking that it is more realistic.’

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