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Egyptian archeologists unearthed 110 burial tombs in an ancient site in the Nile Delta province of Dakahlia around 150 kilometers in the northeast of Cairo.

Tourisim and Antiquities ministry said the archeologists found human remains for adults and children, funerary equipment and pottery objects in these tombs.

The tombs, some of which have human remains, were found in the Koum el-Khulgan archeological site, in the province of Dakahlia, around 150 kilometers (93 miles) northeast of Cairo, it said.

They include 68 oval-like tombs dating back to the Predynastic Period that spanned from 6000-3150 B.C. with the raid of the First Dynasty of Pharaonic Egypt, the ministry said.

There were also 37 rectangular-like tombs from an ancient era known as the Second Intermediate Period (1782-1570 B.C.), when the Semitic people of Hyksos ruled ancient Egypt, the ministry added.

The remaining five toms date back to the Naqada III period that spanned from around 3200 B.C. to 3000 B.C.

The discovery is the latest in a series of archeological discoveries in recent years.

Egypt is seeking publicity in the hopes of reviving its tourism sector.

The sector was badly hit by the turmoil following the 2011 uprising, and now the pandemic.

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