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Ministers say they will allow 1,000 fans into a theatre to watch a snooker final – but are stubbornly refusing to raise the 30-person cap on funerals.

To the fury of campaigners and MPs, the Government last night rebuffed calls to review the funeral limit – at the same time as Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said he wanted a full crowd at the world snooker championship final at the Crucible venue in Sheffield.

Ministers hinted they may relax social distancing restrictions so grieving relatives can physically comfort each other. But no change is likely until May 17 at the earliest, and Downing Street is refusing to re-examine the cap of 30 for funerals in England. 

Mr Dowden said he hoped a full crowd will watch the Crucible final beginning on May 2.

The move follows a ‘successful’ pilot scheme which has seen the venue operate at one-third capacity this week, with fans tested on entry. Capacity will increase to 50 per cent immediately, with almost 500 fans allowed in, rising to 75 per cent – about 735 fans – for the quarter and semi-finals next week.

To the fury of campaigners and MPs, the Government last night rebuffed calls to review the funeral limit – at the same time as Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said he wanted a full crowd at the world snooker championship final at the Crucible venue in Sheffield

To the fury of campaigners and MPs, the Government last night rebuffed calls to review the funeral limit – at the same time as Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said he wanted a full crowd at the world snooker championship final at the Crucible venue in Sheffield

To the fury of campaigners and MPs, the Government last night rebuffed calls to review the funeral limit – at the same time as Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said he wanted a full crowd at the world snooker championship final at the Crucible venue in Sheffield

Full capacity would then be allowed for the final. Fans do not have to socially distance.

Ministers are piloting other mass events, including allowing 6,000 revellers to attend Liverpool’s Circus nightclub over two nights next week. There will be 4,000 at next month’s Brit Awards, and they won’t need to wear masks or be socially distanced.

As a new study – the biggest examination of ‘real-world’ UK vaccination data – found both the Pfizer and Oxford jabs slashed infections and transmission of the virus, campaigners, MPs and charities demanded that ministers look again at the funeral restrictions and the cap on numbers.

The Daily Mail has campaigned for the cap to be eased and yesterday revealed that as many as 80,000 families could be forced to grieve under the restrictions over the next two months.

Carolyn Harris, the Labour MP who serves as Sir Keir Starmer’s parliamentary private secretary and is a prominent campaigner on funerals, said it was ‘completely insensitive’ to allow snooker fans to gather but not mourners.

Mr Dowden said he hoped a full crowd will watch the Crucible final beginning on May 2. The move follows a 'successful' pilot scheme which has seen the venue operate at one-third capacity this week, with fans tested on entry

Mr Dowden said he hoped a full crowd will watch the Crucible final beginning on May 2. The move follows a 'successful' pilot scheme which has seen the venue operate at one-third capacity this week, with fans tested on entry

Mr Dowden said he hoped a full crowd will watch the Crucible final beginning on May 2. The move follows a ‘successful’ pilot scheme which has seen the venue operate at one-third capacity this week, with fans tested on entry

She said if someone at the ‘saddest time in their life can’t have a little group of people around them, and yet they could go and see those people if they went to watch a game of snooker – to me, that is completely insensitive’.

‘If they are prepared to make those kinds of decisions around sporting activities – I’m not saying that’s wrong – you must have parity. And for me, somebody who is grieving at a funeral is far more important than a sporting activity.’

Mrs Harris, who recently lost her father as well as other family and friends, said she found it hard not being able to see the bereaved.

‘I would want to see some kind of bubble that you could actually have the person who is bereaved and people around them to go and comfort them.

‘It’s a very lonely and isolating time and that’s when we need people. It’s just awful and I found that really difficult.’ Senior Tory MP Sir Iain Duncan Smith said the Government was ‘rapidly getting a reputation for being both irreligious and also inconsistent’.

As a new study – the biggest examination of 'real-world' UK vaccination data – found both the Pfizer and Oxford jabs slashed infections and transmission of the virus, campaigners, MPs and charities demanded that ministers look again at the funeral restrictions and the cap on numbers. Pictured: Brit Awards

As a new study – the biggest examination of 'real-world' UK vaccination data – found both the Pfizer and Oxford jabs slashed infections and transmission of the virus, campaigners, MPs and charities demanded that ministers look again at the funeral restrictions and the cap on numbers. Pictured: Brit Awards

As a new study – the biggest examination of ‘real-world’ UK vaccination data – found both the Pfizer and Oxford jabs slashed infections and transmission of the virus, campaigners, MPs and charities demanded that ministers look again at the funeral restrictions and the cap on numbers. Pictured: Brit Awards

Ministers hinted they may relax social distancing restrictions so grieving relatives can physically comfort each other. But no change is likely until May 17 at the earliest, and Downing Street is refusing to re-examine the cap of 30 for funerals in England

Ministers hinted they may relax social distancing restrictions so grieving relatives can physically comfort each other. But no change is likely until May 17 at the earliest, and Downing Street is refusing to re-examine the cap of 30 for funerals in England

Ministers hinted they may relax social distancing restrictions so grieving relatives can physically comfort each other. But no change is likely until May 17 at the earliest, and Downing Street is refusing to re-examine the cap of 30 for funerals in England

Pictured: The Queen sits alone during Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday

Pictured: The Queen sits alone during Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday

Pictured: The Queen sits alone during Prince Philip’s funeral on Saturday

Ray of hope for funeral hugs 

By Harriet Line Chief Political Correspondent for the Daily Mail 

Grieving families may finally be able to hug at funerals as early as next month.

Government sources said they were ‘hopeful’ that a review would reduce social distancing restrictions within weeks.

Mourners must stay at least two metres apart from others outside their household or support bubble under the current ‘inhumane’ restrictions.

Campaigners are urging ministers to reconsider so family members can hold a relatives’ hand or give them a hug. The Mail has also called for lateral flow testing to reduce the need for social distancing at funerals.

In the first signs of a breakthrough, a Government source last night said: ‘We know how important this is for everyone, so the plan is to look at the possibilities around whether it’s safe to remove social distancing rules for friends and family at the next step.’ A separate Cabinet Office review on wider social distancing is to report before June 21.

Downing Street yesterday also hinted at a relaxation. The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: ‘We need to strike that important balance between the needs of the bereaved and the need to minimise the spread of a deadly virus. I think rightly, and as the public would want, we want to continue to look at how we can make these moments easier for people.’

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He added: ‘It’s good news for snooker, but why not churches and actually why not now restaurants? This is beginning to look a bit inconsistent, if not a touch irreligious.’

Conservative MP Sir John Hayes, chairman of the all-party parliamentary group for funerals and bereavement, said: ‘Clearly everyone wants to get this right but the funeral industry and all that are associated with the sector are well used to the disciplines associated with funerals.

‘I’m confident that the professionals in the sector could work with the Government to make sure that a relaxation of the numbers was done in a way which is safe.’

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng was robustly challenged over the funeral rules yesterday.

LBC presenter Nick Ferrari asked the Cabinet minister why people could sit alongside others in a pub garden, snooker game or aeroplane but the 30-person cap on mourners remained in place. Mr Kwarteng said: ‘We’re always looking at the rules… but I think it was very important that we are consistent and that we hit the dates as we said.

‘The one thing you would blame me for is if we relaxed rules and then for whatever reason the coronavirus spiked and we had to, God forbid, go into lockdown. That would be a disaster and you would rightly be lambasting me.’

Downing Street said it was important to strike a balance between the ‘needs of the bereaved and the need to minimise the spread of a deadly virus’.

Funeral director David Barrington, 52, who runs a business with his wife Claire in Liverpool, spoke of how it ‘tugs at the heartstrings’ to be unable to help families in the usual way.

Mr Barrington said that in 27 years in the sector, the past 12 months had been the ‘toughest’, adding: ‘Now that we see places opening up and relaxing… it seems more sensible to start to do the same here.

‘It would definitely be a kinder way of holding funerals because as we move forward… all of a sudden funerals start to look a bit sparse. You’ve got people sitting outside pubs and very soon you’re going to have people going inside restaurants.’ 

THE D-DAY HERO WHO DESERVED SO MUCH MORE  

The daughter of a D-Day hero whose funeral was this week said the Government needs to review the rules as families only have ‘one hit’ at giving loved ones fitting send-offs.

Sara Lilly spoke out just a day after her father Albert – a Royal Engineer who landed on Gold Beach on June 6, 1944 – had his service at a crematorium where numbers were strictly limited.

She said: ‘We had 30 people there but that place would have been packed. It’s about [the government] getting it right. There’s only one hit at this.’ Great-grandfather Mr Lilly, below, helped to build a vital airfield to support Allied troops within three days of landing in Normandy. He was later involved in the bruising Battle of Tilly-la-Campagne, witnessed the horror of a concentration camp, and fought all the way to Berlin.

The family of D-Day veteran Albert Lilly look at flowers in the flower courtyard after his funeral service at The Oaks Havant Crematorium in Hampshire

The family of D-Day veteran Albert Lilly look at flowers in the flower courtyard after his funeral service at The Oaks Havant Crematorium in Hampshire

The family of D-Day veteran Albert Lilly look at flowers in the flower courtyard after his funeral service at The Oaks Havant Crematorium in Hampshire

Mr Lilly was a corporal when he was demobbed in 1947, but his remarkable service to his country continued later as an engineer in the RAF. 

He went on to become a painter and decorator. 

He was awarded the Legion d’honneur, France’s highest honour, on his birthday last year and met Prince Charles and Theresa May during the 75th anniversary commemorations for D-Day.

D-Day veteran Albert Lilly

D-Day veteran Albert Lilly

D-Day veteran Albert Lilly

The widower, who raised his daughters Sara and Susie as a single parent after his wife Kathleen died in 1975, passed away on March 29 at home in Portsmouth.

Standard bearers marched ahead of his hearse as his funeral procession arrived at the Oaks Crematorium in Havant on Wednesday.

The Last Post was played following the service.

Miss Lilly, 55, a senior sister in intensive care at the city’s Queen Alexandra Hospital, said public safety must remain a priority but suggested the Government should at least review how many can attend funerals, especially when they are held in large-capacity venues.

 

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COACH WITH THE GIFT TO INSPIRE 

As a much-loved football coach for over 25 years, it was only natural that hundreds of former pupils wanted to pay their respects to Kevyn Gibbons.

As a much-loved football coach for over 25 years, it was only natural that hundreds of former pupils wanted to pay their respects to Kevyn Gibbons

As a much-loved football coach for over 25 years, it was only natural that hundreds of former pupils wanted to pay their respects to Kevyn Gibbons

As a much-loved football coach for over 25 years, it was only natural that hundreds of former pupils wanted to pay their respects to Kevyn Gibbons

Mr Gibbons died in March at the age of 79 after a series of falls during lockdown. 

He’d had a storied career, playing for Oldham, scouting for Manchester City and Blackburn Rovers and coaching young players across Greater Manchester.

His widow Angela said yesterday that the ‘worst part’ of organising his funeral later that month was that there were ‘so many lads saying they were devastated and wanted to pay their respects’.

Staff and players at Oldham Athletic stood outside their stadium as the procession passed. 

Mrs Gibbons said she would have expected more than a hundred mourners, and was gripped with worry about breaking the limit when she should have been remembering her husband.

 

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